Units of space are everywhere. We can see them all around us. When we package a unit of space distinctly, we call it a container. Whether on ships in the sea, or in a storage closet, we use containers to organize things into isolated and distinct units of space. In the computing world, containers have become the distinguishing structure used to isolate and organize elements of software code. Just like containers on ships or in the closet, they can be visualized.

In today’s web-centric IT world, application programming interfaces (APIs), command-line interfaces (CLIs), microservices, and other deployable software code releases all tend to reside in containers. In point of fact, container utilization has become a powerful way in which to build and maintain consistently efficient quality-controlled systems, and it has become a cornerstone of modern devops.

What is devops? In a multifaceted business enterprise, people work together to achieve goals in an agile fashion. In the tech world, that foundation is based on a triangulated core in which software development, product management, and business operations staff communicate and collaborate throughout the product life cycle. These resources need each other, and we generally refer to their symbiotic relationship as being the culture behind development operations—devops. 

Devops is where continuous quality improvement (CQI) and other best-practice methodologies either fulfill or fail. It’s where ISO and Six Sigma standards are either met or missed. Most importantly, devops is where product ownership originates.

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