WikiLeaks  details about what it says are CIA hacking tools with the tech companies so that software fixes can be developed.

But will software companies want it?

The information WikiLeaks plans to share comes from 8,700-plus documents it says were stolen from an internal CIA server. If the data is classified—and it almost certainly is—possessing it would be a crime.

That was underlined on Thursday by White House press secretary Sean Spicer, who advised tech vendors to consider the legal consequences of receiving documents from WikiLeaks.

 their products.

“WikiLeaks has a lot more information on what has been going on with the (CIA) cyberweapons program,” Assange said.

And there’s another worry: If WikiLeaks managed to get its hands on the data, it could be elsewhere too, increasing the risk that companies and consumers are being watched online.

So the U.S. government should be  helping tech vendors patch the vulnerabilities involved in the leak, said John Bambenek, manager of threat systems at Fidelis Cybersecurity.

“Right now, there’s only risk and no reward,” Bambenek said. “We need to fix that risk.”

It’s unclear when WikiLeaks plans to begin sharing the information.

On Thursday, vendors including Microsoft, along with the security firms Avira and Comodo, said that WikiLeaks hasn’t contacted them yet.  

“Our preferred method for anyone with knowledge of security issues, including the CIA or WikiLeaks, is to submit details to us at ,” Microsoft said in an email.  

Others such as antivirus vendor Bitdefender said they expect WikiLeaks to reach out to them probably over the following days.

“If WikiLeaks do want to reach out to us, we are always grateful for an opportunity to make our products even better,” the company said in an email.

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